Redeeming Ruth: Everything Life Takes, Love Restores

Winner of a 2018 Christopher Award for books that inspire

and the 2018 Maine Literary Award for memoir!

 

Meadow Rue Merrill dreamed of the perfect family: two boys and a girl. Then she and her husband, Dana, would adopt. Together they prayed, “Lord, if you have another child for us, you will have to bring that child to us.” Miraculously, God did. Only that child wasn’t what they’d imagined. Born in Uganda and abandoned at birth, Ruth had severe disabilities. Would they adopt her? That was the question God seemed to be asking. The answer would stretch their faith, test their endurance, and bring them more joy than they’d ever imagined. It would also break their hearts and open their eyes to the needs of other abandoned children and people with disabilities in the developing world. All royalties benefit orphans and people with disabilities in Uganda.

Meadow Rue Merrill is the award winning author of the inspirational memoir, Redeeming Ruth: Everything Life Takes, Love Restores. A former journalist, she began her career as a reporter for a small Maine paper, spent eight years corresponding for The Boston Globe, and contributed articles to Down East magazine, The New York Times and The Boston Sunday Globe Magazine while raising six children. She currently writes inspirational books for children and adults from a little house in the big woods of midcoast Maine.

Faith Notes: Words that Encourage

Life is often rough, mine included. Some days seem designed to crush your hopes and dreams. For inspiration and understanding, I turn to the same words that have guided generations, the Scriptures. Are you weary? Searching for encouragement? Me too! Faith Notes are weekly, Scripture-based meditations drawn from my everyday life and shared in the hope that they will strengthen your faith and brighten your day. Subscribe below.

A Father to Celebrate

Every Father’s Day my mother bought herself the same present: a tool. Might be a new hammer or a shovel or a set of wrenches. With my father living in another state, a farm to run and two children to raise, she filled the role of both father and mother and accordingly treated herself to a gift on the big day.

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In the Master’s Garden

Little inspired me to plant a vegetable garden this year. The spring air seemed abysmally cold. I’d waited too long to start my seedlings indoors. And each day I looked out my kitchen window at my little plot of soil, the weeds stood taller. But I had a choice: Spend all summer watching the weeds grow taller or get out there and do something.

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Book Review: The Choice, Embrace the Possible

One reward of attending the Christopher Awards in New York this spring was coming home with a bag full of books from other award winners, stories of hope and friendship and of overcoming great obstacles to do great good. Only, one story I wasn’t sure I wanted to read. It is the story of Dr. Edith Eva Eger, among the few remaining Holocaust survivors who was sent to Auschwitz with her parents and sister.

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When Schools Become a Battleground, Who is to Blame?

My husband, Dana, and I were on a bus, headed home from New York City, last weekend when we crossed into Maine and saw an American flag lowered to half-staff. “What is it this time?” I asked. Only after we arrived home did we learn of the school shooting that morning in Sante Fe, Texas, in which two teachers and eight students were killed. It seems that our flag is often flying lower these days. We are a country perpetually in mourning.

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For Mothers When it’s Hard

This one is for the mothers. The ones serving in the hardest places. Those whose children have special needs. Those whose children are battling addiction or illness or struggling to overcome difficult choices. Those who love children they have lost. Those raising not just their children but their grandchildren.

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