Redeeming Ruth

Winner of a 2018 Christopher Award and the 2018 Maine Literary Award for memoir.

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The Christmas Cradle

A delightful story that will bring the whole family together to celebrate the true reason for Christmas. Releases this fall with RoseKidz.

Look for more Lantern Hill Farm picture books in 2019, including The Backward Easter Egg Hunt.

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Redeeming Ruth: Everything Life Takes, Love Restores

Winner of a 2018 Christopher Award for books that inspire

and the 2018 Maine Literary Award for memoir!

 

Meadow Rue Merrill dreamed of the perfect family: two boys and a girl. Then she and her husband, Dana, would adopt. Together they prayed, “Lord, if you have another child for us, you will have to bring that child to us.” Miraculously, God did. Only that child wasn’t what they’d imagined. Born in Uganda and abandoned at birth, Ruth had severe disabilities. Would they adopt her? That was the question God seemed to be asking. The answer would stretch their faith, test their endurance, and bring them more joy than they’d ever imagined. It would also break their hearts and open their eyes to the needs of other abandoned children and people with disabilities in the developing world. All royalties benefit orphans and people with disabilities in Uganda.

Meadow Rue Merrill is the award winning author of the inspirational memoir, Redeeming Ruth: Everything Life Takes, Love Restores. A former journalist, she began her career as a reporter for a small Maine paper, spent eight years corresponding for The Boston Globe, and contributed articles to Down East magazine, The New York Times and The Boston Sunday Globe Magazine while raising six children. She currently writes inspirational books for children and adults from a little house in the big woods of midcoast Maine.

Faith Notes: Words that Encourage

Life is often rough, mine included. Some days seem designed to crush your hopes and dreams. For inspiration and understanding, I turn to the same words that have guided generations, the Scriptures. Are you weary? Searching for encouragement? Me too! Faith Notes are weekly, Scripture-based meditations drawn from my everyday life and shared in the hope that they will strengthen your faith and brighten your day. Subscribe below.

A Barn Full of Love

Crisscrossing strands of white lights dangled from the 200-year-old rafters of my friend Jenny’s barn. In one corner, pinecone angel ornaments hung from a fresh-cut tree. A picnic table at the end of the room held paper cups of markers and scissors, ready for the children and parents who squashed up the rain-soaked hillside last weekend to celebrate the launch of my first children’s picture book, The Christmas Cradle. After nearly two decades of spending much of my free time alone, clacking computer keys in the fragile hope that what I wrote would someday be published, last week’s party was a true delight.

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A Power Greater than Yourself

There’s an election next week. But I find it hard to concentrate on who’s running for what with the tragedy in Pittsburgh where eleven people were gunned down in an anti-Semitic attack on a synagogue. With masses of desperate people crowding our southern border, hoping for a better life. With the New York Times’s photos of starving Yemeni children. There’s trouble in this world of ours, where hate seeks its own way again and again and again.

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The Model of Love

I turned the page in the biography I was reading to my children about the life of Amy Carmichael, an Irish missionary to India in the early 1900s, when I came across a scene that typified what angers so many about the history of Christian missions: a procession of Indian servants carrying a group of British ministers and their wives on sedan chairs. For each missionary (other than Carmichael, who rode horseback), it took eight men to carry each chair.

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Fable’s Faults and Foibles

The first surprise about our rescue puppy was that she wasn’t a puppy. “She’s about nine months old, nearly full grown,” the vet said last month, prying apart the jaws of the pup we’d named Fable. “She has all her adult teeth.”

“I knew it!” I said to my husband, Dana, when he drove her home with the news. Ever since we’d brought Fable home at the beginning of September, her small feet and delicate, lean build had made me suspect that the ‘three months old’ description on the animal adoption site where we’d found her profile was wrong.

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Where Has Our Love Gone?

Like many, I was shocked last week when a painting “Girl With Balloon” by the British street artist Banksy sold for a record $1.4 million at Sotheby’s auction house only to instantly self-destruct. Like many, I’d never heard of the enigmatic artist before his stunt flashed across the world’s news feeds, showing a painting of a girl with a heart shaped balloon slipping through the bottom of its frame and being destroyed by a shredder as a wealthy, art-loving audience looked on.
I laughed. Then I contemplated what it means to live in a world that often values paint and paper more than people, the temporal more than the timeless.

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Don’t Give Up Before the Blessing

Early this past summer, between the rows of kale and marigolds in my make-do garden, I planted four leafy-green Brussel sprouts. Tomatoes I knew. Cucumbers and green beans and zucchini too. I’d never grown Brussel sprouts, but the thought of harvesting my own organic, farm-to-table mini cruciferous cabbages was too delectable to resist. So I scooped four shallow holes in my loamy soil, packed it around the promising shoots and waited to see what grew.

All summer I watered and weeded—sometimes too much, sometimes too little. The shiny red orbs of cherry tomatoes ripened first, followed by prickly-skinned cucumbers. Heavy leaves grew wide from the now thick shoots of the Brussel sprouts.

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